Home > Product Reviews, Uncategorized > Product Review: Krylon Kamar Varnish

Product Review: Krylon Kamar Varnish

October 1, 2011

I have wondered many times what magical formula is in this can.  Damar tree resin is a traditional varnish material for oil paints, yet Krylon Kamar Varnish advertises it can be used on oil, acrylic and watercolour paintings.  Maybe it is Damar tree resin, a thinner and some kind or stabilizer, or it could be totally synthetic.  It sprays on easily, dries quickly and looks great.  The can indicates:

“This museum-quality varnish is highly resistant to discoloration and offers superior clarity and durability.”

As it turns out, I had no idea how to varnish an oil painting for many years, but it never mattered.  Many traditional, brush-on liquid varnishes require the oil painting to sit for six months to a year.  I had latched onto the Krylon Kamar years ago because I did not want to struggle with keeping hand applied brush strokes of varnish even on the surface of a painting.  I like spray cans; they are fast and easy to use.  No one ever taught me that the oil painting needs several months to a year of time to harden before using a varnish.  As soon as the surface of the oil painting was hard to the touch, sometimes within a week, I used the Krylon Kamar Varnish.  I have paintings up to six years old, and they are all fine.  There has been no yellowing or cracking of the varnish, even over thicker impasto layers of paint.  One painting has been hanging on the wall, exposed to sunlight, all this time and looks fine.

There are UV protective varieties of Krylon sealants but I have not tried them yet.  The Kamar has proven to be useful and multi-purpose.  I have always liked how it adds a nice gloss to my oil paintings.  If you use a watercolour painting stretched canvas, you need to seal it to keep the paint from rubbing off; and a spray can is ideal to protect the work because you are not dragging a brush across the surface of the delicate painting.

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